figurehead

I found this sweet little figurehead upstairs in the Victoria Inn in Salcombe, South Devon (highly recommended by the way).   I really don’t know if its a restoration, reproduction, or new carving but I do know I really like it,  the tilt of the head just gives the whole piece a lift.  I did ask the staff for any information about her but I’m afraid they were none the wiser.

 

 

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Bear

Travel tip, do not go up the funicular from the river to the palace in Budapest, its a tourist trap, and a very expensive one.  Go one stop down the tram railway and ride the escalator in the palace gardens behind the ladies gate.  The gardens are beautiful; the entrance buildings are stunning.  Right by the escalator is a little water spout, a bear in the Bavarian (I think) style.  The more you look the better he gets, the modelling is stunning.  These photos should be enough for any half decent carver to develop a pattern from.

 

 

Budapest Photos

OK, so I did say, back in September, I would post some more carving-related snaps when I found my camera-sinc lead.  Couldn’t find it anywhere so I finally invested in a new card reader.  Anyway, as promised, some photo-sets.

 

First just a couple of the doors, door surrounds and door decor that seem to be a significant element of the decorative features of architecture in the city.

Lions are everywhere you look around the palace quarter but these particularly caught my eye

And the eagle, of course.

Undercutting

 

This is a little acanthus scroll trailboard for a Victorian launch restoration, currently at the tweak and finish stage. The turn at the bow end is a little too oval, but otherwise it’s coming together nicely. The thing that really makes a deep relief like this ‘pop’ is to undercut it.  Undercutting is done to take the sides of the design out of sight. It is important that this is not overdone or the edges will be weakened. It is also important the back of the carving keeps in contact with the hull; if it is raised it will be susceptible to  breaking off when the carving gets knocked. The thing to bear in mind is to avoid pockets for water to collect in.

 

The first picture shows a vertical view but even here some of the sides of the carving are visible.

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Whereas this image is only slightly off-vertical and the sides are clear to see.

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Figureheads – part 3

Wow, a whole year has past since the last entry on this series, now that’s what I call ‘occasional’!

OK, so if you recall, I made a big thing about the importance of the jaw-line.  Well, now that I have finally taken some photos of the Brest Tiller, I can illustrate the point with the view of the face from under the neck.   The image also nicely illustrates the prominence of the nose, and, if you look very carefully, the curve of the forehead is just about visible too. dscf3772

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tiller to Brest – update

Things are progressing, slowly, but I am still more-or-less on schedule, having managed to cobble together somewhere near 20 hours carving on the tiller in between and around other work.  I know I felt I would leave the rope-work until the whole thing was roughed out but in the end I have concentrated on getting it done and now the ropework is nearing completion; I think about 5 more hours should see it done.

Hopefully you can see that the work is much deeper and more fully rounded.  You might also see where I have started some fancy ‘whipping’ on the one end: more of that in a later post.  Incidentally the only tool I am using at the moment is a 10mm skew-chisel – the pointed end is essential for getting into the tiny spaces

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